Modern Quilting – Modern Women

So I thought I was only going to post once a week, but I’m now just playing it by ear.  Since I am new the crafty blog scene, I am learning a TON about linking up with other bloggers and, well, pretty much everything.  For the time being, you are probably only ever going to see iPod pictures with bad lighting, but I’m working on that, I promise!!

This week I stumbled across a blog written by Crystal over at Two Little Aussie Birds about modern quilting/modern women, and I definitely resonate with both.  She asked a few questions that I thought I would also talk about here!

1. Tell us about how you started quilting and how you found modern quilting.

I started quilting shortly after I quit smoking almost three years ago.  I had actually bought my sewing machine, a Brother Project Runway Special from Walmart, in November 2011, and about five minutes after I pulled it out of the box, while trying to sew two pieces of fabric together, it jammed or made some other loud, scary noise, so I instantly stopped and shoved it away.

Clearly, this was not for me.

January 2012, I decided I had enough.  I was mad at myself for spending money on the start up quilting stuff only to have it collect dust, so I got my machine out, read the manual (seriously not something I’m prone to doing, so this was a pretty big deal), and started sewing!  Like, really sewing!  I had made a lap quilt for a friend and a jersey quilt for my boss, and other quilts along the way, but I didn’t really find modern quilting – and understand what it meant until I joined Instagram a year and a half ago.

2. What does it mean to you to be a modern quilter and a modern woman? 

To me, being a modern quilter is being a quilter that takes chances.  Someone that isn’t afraid to put neon orange with baby pink (I wouldn’t…or at least I don’t think I would…). Basically, someone that is willing to take risks with their beloved fabric and just see where it takes them.

Being a modern woman is a woman that can hold her own, but relies on others strengths while supplying her strengths to others.  Through this new blog, and the community therein, I have found some incredible and amazing women who are like super stars to me.  I know they are busy either running a sewing/crafty/blogging business, or being moms who work and craft and have husbands, but they are so sweet to take time out of their busy-ness to help me figure out what a link party is or encourage me when I have a tough week, or check in on me when I’m quiet (trust me, even people that I know in person get nervous when that happens!).

I honestly hope, that as I grow and learn, that I will be half as helpful to others as these ladies have been to me.

3. Which quilt that you have made represents you and why?

Oh mercy.  Let’s see…I never thought I would say this, but I think if I were to pick a quilt that represents me, it would be a quilt I disliked while making it.  That sounds weird, and it has more to do with the pattern than the color pallet, but it was the one quilt that (a) took me the longest (mostly because I put it away for months on end), and (b) grew me the most.  It holds the honor of being the most “piece-y” quilt I have ever done.

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I think it represents me because I am a constant work in progress.  I don’t ever want to reach perfection, but there are things in my life that I will be working on until my last breath, whether that is my faith, my health, my parenting, sewing, quilting, or the fact that I really dislike cleaning and over-compensate for that by cooking from scratch as often as possible (yes, even tortillas and pasta!). But after going through therapy a couple of years ago, it helped me to realize that we, as humans, are all a constant work in progress, battling our own demons, and giving each other a quarter inch of understanding would go a LONG way in our lives as well as others.

My puzzle quilt was the first quilt that I actually created my own measurements for after being inspired by a few pictures on Pinterest.  The largest pieces were 2.5″ x 6.5″, and they only got smaller from there!  Now, two years later, I would honestly love to do another quilt like this, however I would totally do it in my own colors: Bright and bold!  Maybe Indelible…. 😉

4. How do you connect with other modern quilters?

Most of the time it is through Instagram.  It’s an awesome way to stalk  browse someone’s feed and see what they have been up to and learn new things or color combinations. I am also now part of a Facebook group where I feel like a little fish in a big pond.

That’s it for me tonight.  I actually feel accomplished because I posted my first pic on this blog!!!  Milestone moment!

Happy Creating!!

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6 thoughts on “Modern Quilting – Modern Women

    • You are so sweet! Thank you so much! I can’t say I “designed” this quilt because I really just borrowed the idea of this quilt and picked my own measurements, but it was definitely a quilt that grew me!

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  1. You are smokin now…just kidding. Nice kwilt!. Good pic. Hey as someone who has blogged for a while….I also though I would post once a week. It find it better to just roll with it. Sometimes It’s once a week, some times more, sometimes I skip a week, sometime I do drafts, sometimes I schedule ahead when I know I am gonna be traveling or busy.

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    • Ha! I’m totally doing a draft for an end-of-year “Goal Post” right now! I want to free-form write without worrying about which order words should be in, just getting my ideas down. Once I go on vacation from my day job, I will be tidying it up and posting on New Year’s Day! There may even be MORE PICTURES involved!

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